11.30.2005

Advent III (Gaudete) at the Cathedral

Prelude: Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland -- JS Bach (from the Great Eighteen/Leipzig)

Entrance: On Jordan's Bank / WINCHESTER NEW

Kyrie: from Schiavone's "Advent Wreath Service"

Luke 1: Gelineau

Gospel Acclamation: Alleluia VII -- Berthier

Offertory Hymn: Creator of the Stars of Night / CONDITOR ALME SIDERUM

Anthem (9:30): This is the Record of John -- Orlando Gibbons

Sanctus: Mass XVIII

Acclamation and Amen: Corpus Christi Mass -- Proulx

Agnus Dei: Mass XVIII

Communion: My Soul in Stillness Waits

Recessional: O Come, Divine Messiah / VENEZ DIVIN MESSIE

Postlude: Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme -- JG Walther

Immaculate Conception at the Cathedral

Prelude: Adagio on a Lourdes Traditional Melody -- Alice Jordan

Entrance: Immaculate Mary / LOURDES HYMN

Kyrie: chant, arr. Proulx

Gloria ---- Melodic Gloria (5:3opm Wed.), Peter Jones (7pm Thurs.), recited at 12 noon Thurs. **see note**

Psalm 98: Michel Guimont

Gospel Acclamation: Celtic Alleluia

Offertory: Ave Maria (Schubert or Bach/Gounod at 5:30 and 12 noon, Arcadelt at 7pm)

Ordinary: Community Mass -- Richard Proulx

Agnus Dei: Olawski in G

Communion: Magnificat -- James Chepponis

Recessional: Hail! Holy Queen / SALVE REGINA CAELITUM

Postlude: Machs mit mir, Gott, nach deiner Guet -- Johann Gottfried Walther

**NOTE: The Gloria is recited at 12pm (as well as only singing 3 verses of the Entrance) to facilitate the fact that the majority of the congregation are workers at the Capitol who are attending Holy Mass on their lunch break.

ADVENT ALLELUIA

Completely adapted from the Mode IV chant Conditor Alme Siderum. Originally compiled as part of a collection I did called Acclamations for Advent, basically a Mass for Advent, as it does not include the Gloria (omitted by the rubrics anyways), and completely adapted to the chant tune.

The Alleluia includes the proper verse for each of the four Sundays, as given in the Lectionary for Mass and the Gregorian Missal. As a result, there are two options for two of the Sundays, three options for the Fourth Sunday (the Lectionary itself has two options, according to year).

E-mail me for pricing!

Also included is the legal right to reproduce as many copies as needed for your parish musicians, choristers, celebrant, and congregation. To purchase, please e-mail me. No orders will be accepted via the "Comments" link (though the "Comments" link will be available for feedback purposes). For parish use only. Check or money order must be received before processing (choice of e-mail a .pdf file or snail-mail to your parish).

+In Christ,
BMP

11.29.2005

Advent II at the Cathedral

Prelude: Es ist ein Ros' -- Brahms

Entrance: On Jordan's Bank / WINCHESTER NEW

Act of Penitence Form C (led by cantor)from "Advent Wreath Service" by John Schiavone

Psalm 85: Gelineau

Gospel Acc: Alleluia VII -- Berthier

Offertory: Comfort, Comfort, O My People / FREU DICH SEHR(GENEVA 42)

Offertory Anthem (9:30): "Advent Prayer" -- arr. Liebergen

Sanctus: Mass XVIII

Acclamation and Amen: Corpus Christi Mass -- Proulx

Agnus Dei: Mass XVIII

Communion: Christ, Be Our Light

Recessional: Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus / HYFRYDOL

Postlude: Nun Komm, der Heiden Heiland -- Bach (Orgelbuechlein)

11.28.2005

TWO GREAT ARTICLES

Compliments of THE NEW LITURGICAL MOVEMENT:

First - the 10th Anniversary of Una Voce conference was held in Providence, and included Pontifical High Mass (1962 Missal) at my former parish, Holy Name. The music was praised in the review as "supurb musical accompaniment". I'm not surprised. Jacob Stott, my immediate successor, is very good. I posted a comment on Shawn's article stating that many pastors, upon my leaving, tend to hire someone who can "undo" what I've either done or tried to do. When I left Holy Name, however, Fr. Fisette did it different - he hired someone who could "keep it going". Jacob not only keeps it going, but he builds on it quite nicely. Holy Name is a parish that, although I no longer work there, I take great pride in! It's parishioners and music ministry are wonderful.

Second - Worshipping the Lord in the Beauty of Holiness - Fr. Jay Scott Newman, pastor of Saint Mary's in Greenville, SC, gives a great detail of how his parish became, and how your parish can become, the role model for Sacred Liturgy. Great for priests and laity alike that are involved in ministry. RECOMMENDED READING!!!

Peace,
BMP

MY FIRST CONCERT IN SIX YEARS

The last time I did a concert was at Holy Name Church in Providence - in 1999. For the first time since then, I will have a choir in concert at Holy Ghost Church in Tiverton. This concert will take place on Wednesday, December 28, at 7:00 PM at Holy Ghost.

Guest organist will be Reuel Gifford. Special guests will be Nick Fleming and select members of the Tiverton High School Band.

FINAL lineup:
SEGMENT 1 (choral anthems and organ pieces)
Page - Rejoice in the Lord always
Holst (arr.) - Let all mortal flesh keep silence
Gastoldi/Page - Laetentur caeli
Adam - O Holy Night
Vaughan Williams - Prelude on "Lovely" (I will be at the organ for this one)
Beethoven - The Worship of God in Nature

SEGMENT 2 - (TBA) Nick and band

SEGMENT 3 (carol sing with audience)
Joy to the World
O Little Town of Bethlehem
What Child is This
Angels We Have Heard on High
It Came upon a Midnight Clear
Hark! the Herald Angels Sing
Silent Night
O Come, All Ye Faithful (arr. Willcocks)

Wish me well. This is my first concert in six years as a conductor, and my second concert EVER.

+In Christ,
BMP

11.27.2005

RESPONSORIAL PSALMS FOR ADVENT - NOW AVAILABLE

11 Psalms - ready to go!

LET US GO REJOICING - First Sunday of Advent (A)
Metrical antiphon in SATB (6/8), psalm tone style verses.
LORD, MAKE US TURN TO YOU - First Sunday of Advent (B); Fourth Sunday of Advent (C)
Metrical antiphon for unison voices (4/4), psalm tone style verses.
TO YOU, O LORD - First Sunday of Advent (C)
Metrical antiphon in SATB (4/4), psalm tone style verses.
Also includes verses for All Souls

JUSTICE SHALL FLOURISH IN HIS TIME - Second Sunday of Advent (A)
Metrical antiphon in SATB (3/4), psalm tone style verses.
LORD, LET US SEE YOUR KINDNESS - Second Sunday of Advent (B)
Metrical antiphon for unison voices with descant (3/2), psalm tone style verses.
Also appointed for the Fifteenth Sunday of Ordinary Time (B) and the Nineteenth Sunday of Ordinary Time (A)
THE LORD HAS DONE GREAT THINGS FOR US - Second Sunday of Advent (C)
Metrical antiphon for SATB (4/4), psalm tone style verses.
Also appointed for the Fifth Sunday of Lent (C) and the Thirtieth Sunday of Ordinary Time (B)
LORD, COME AND SAVE US - Third Sunday of Advent (A)
Verses set to Psalm Tone 8G, antiphon is metrical (2/2) and in SATB, but adapted to the same Psalm Tone.
MY SOUL REJOICES - Third Sunday of Advent (B)
Completely in a chant style, for unison voices.
CRY OUT WITH JOY AND GLADNESS - Third Sunday of Advent (C)
Completely metrical (4/4), with a Richard Proulx/Leo Nestor type flair.

LET THE LORD ENTER - Fourth Sunday of Advent (A)
A festive adaptation of Psalm Tone 8G for SATB.
FOR EVER I WILL SING - Fourth Sunday of Advent (B)
Metrical antiphon (4/4) for SATB (two harmonies), with Psalm tone style verses.
Also includes verses for Christmas (Vigil Mass), Holy Week (Chrism Mass), and the Thirteenth Sunday of Ordinary Time (A)

All texts conform to the current Lectionary for Mass. All music by Brian Michael Page.

E-mail me for prices!
Prices are in United States Dollars. Also included is the legal right to reproduce as many copies as needed for your parish musicians, choristers, celebrant, and congregation. To purchase, please e-mail me. No orders will be accepted via the "Comments" link (though the "Comments" link will be available for feedback purposes). For parish use only. Check or money order must be received before processing (choice of e-mail a .pdf file or snail-mail to your parish).

+In Christ,
BMP

MUSIC for II ADVENT at HOLY GHOST CHURCH

Hey Nick, I beat ya to it this time - neener neener! (LOL)

DECEMBER 4, 2005
II ADVENT

All numbers indicated are in the back of the Missalette.
Introit hymn: STUTTGART - Come, thou long-expected Jesus (#20)
Psalm: Page - Lord, let us see your kindness
Alleluia: Mode IV, adapt. Page (adapt. from "Conditor Alme Siderum")
Offertory hymn: CONDITOR ALME SIDERUM - Creator of the stars of night (#35)
Sanctus: Vermulst - People's Mass
Mysterium: Mortem tuam annuntiamus, Domine
Amen: single
Lord's Prayer: chant/English
Agnus Dei: Vermulst - People's Mass
Communion hynm: VENI, VENI, EMMANUEL - O come, O come, Emmanuel (#19)
Recessional hymn: WINCHESTER NEW - On Jordan's bank the baptist's cry (#21)

ABOUT THE MUSIC:
My own setting of the Responsorial Psalm was written in the summer of 1995. The Alleluia adaptation dates back to 1991, and was included in a collection I later put together called "Acclamations for Advent", a complete Mass, but without the Gloria (after all, there is no Gloria during Advent except for Solemnities and Feasts).
The recessional hymn, On Jordan's Bank, sums up the Gospel reading for the day. The choice of O Come, O Come, Emmanuel as a Communion hymn is ideal for the typical hymn-oriented Communion procession. People will know the first verse, and at least chime in on the "rejoice, rejoice" for subsequent verses. Plus there are seven verses, which is great when the Communion line goes a bit long.

+In Christ,
BMP

11.26.2005

BY THE WAY, THE GRADUALS ARE DONE TOO!!!

Yes - and there are five for Advent! One for each of the First, Second, and Fourth Sundays, and two for the Third Sunday (yes, the one for Year B is different from the one for Years A and C). They follow the responsorial pattern as prescribed in the Gregorian Missal, using the last lines as a verse and the first lines as the antiphon. Additional verses are added for an optional extension.

While the antiphons for all the Graduals below are metrical, all the verses are in chant-style Psalm tones.

First Sunday:
THOSE WHO WAIT FOR YOU, O LORD - Music by Brian Michael Page, 1995 (verses) and 2005 (antiphon).

Second Sunday:
OUT OF SION HIS BEAUTY SHINES - Music by Brian Michael Page, 2005.
HEAR THE MIDI FILE

Third Sunday:
(Years A and C) O LORD, ENTHRONED UPON THE CHERUBIM - Music by Brian Michael Page, 1995 (verses) and 2005 (antiphon). Verses are in the same tone as that found in People of Sion
(Year B) THERE WAS A MAN SENT FORTH FROM GOD - Music by Brian Michael Page, 1995 (verses) and 2005 (antiphon). Verses are in the same tone as that found in Those Who Wait for You, O Lord, above. In addition to the required verse, three verses from Psalm 25 are included.

Fourth Sunday:
THE LORD IS NEAR TO ALL WHO CALL UPON HIM - Music by Brian Michael Page, 1991 (verses) and 2005 (antiphon).

E-mail me for prices!
Prices are in United States Dollars. Also included is the legal right to reproduce as many copies as needed for your parish musicians, choristers, celebrant, and congregation. To purchase, please e-mail me. No orders will be accepted via the "Comments" link (though the "Comments" link will be available for feedback purposes). For parish use only. Check or money order must be received before processing (choice of e-mail a .pdf file or snail-mail to your parish).

+In Christ,
BMP

ALL FOUR ADVENT INTROITS - DONE!

From the pen of Brian Michael Page - four Introits! One is a hymn based thereon, and the other three responsories. One of the three responsories has an antiphon that is adapted from a known Advent chant.

E-mail me for prices!

For the First Sunday of Advent:
LORD, I LIFT MY SOUL TO THEE (Link is full description and access to MIDI file)

For the Second Sunday of Advent:
PEOPLE OF SION - Antiphon text from the Roman Missal, 1973 / Verse text from the New American Bible / Music by Brian Michael Page, 2005 (antiphon) and 1995 (verses). A proclamatory antiphon setting in 3/4 (unison) with verses written in a Psalm-tone style.

For the Third Sunday of Advent:
REJOICE IN THE LORD ALWAYS - Antiphon text translated from the Roman Gradual / Verse text from the New American Bible / Music by Brian Michael Page, 2005 (antiphon) and 1995 (verses). A joyful antiphon in 6/4 with verses (unison with a descant) written in a Psalm-tone style.

For the Fourth Sunday of Advent:
RORATE CAELI DESUPER/PSALM 19 - Antiphon in Latin from the Roman Gradual / New American Bible / Music by Brian Michael Page, 2005 (antiphon) and 1995 (verses). Antiphon is a metrical adaptation of the familiar Advent chant Rorate Caeli Desuper, so that the additional line "Aperiatur terra et germinet Salvatorem" can also fit, with an "ah" descant. Verses are in a Psalm-tone style.

All pieces are intended to be accompanied by the organ.

Prices are in United States Dollars. Also included is the legal right to reproduce as many copies as needed for your parish musicians, choristers, celebrant, and congregation. To purchase, please e-mail me. No orders will be accepted via the "Comments" link (though the "Comments" link will be available for feedback purposes). For parish use only. Check or money order must be received before processing (choice of e-mail a .pdf file or snail-mail to your parish).

+In Christ,
BMP

11.23.2005

THE GOOD, THE BAD, THE UGLY (Feasting Edition)

Sorry, Brian, but had to jump on the bandwagon. Seeing as how Thanksgiving's tomorrow, I thought a food- oriented one might be appropriate.

The Good: "Panis Angelicus"
The Bad: "We Come to the Feast"
The Ugly: "We Come to the Feast" sung in Vegas lounge style, like the Christmas In Heaven scene at the end of Monty Python's The Meaning of Life.

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY (Special Advent Edition)

The Good: "On Jordan's Bank" or "Comfort, Comfort, Ye My People" (tie)
The Bad: "A Voice Cries Out" (Joncas)
The Ugly: "A Voice Cries Out" performed by the New Christy Minstrels to an audience of bar clientele rocking left and right on their stools and swinging their beer mugs.

On behalf of Nick and myself, a very happy Thanksgiving to all readers and their families.

Peace,
BMP

Advent Vespers and Recital

Yours truly has been asked to provide a 30 minute recital this coming weekend at Good Shepherd Catholic Church, Camp Hill, PA. Their tradition is to celebrate Vespers on the four Sundays of Advent, with a recital preceding the Office. My program will be as follows:

Prelude on Light One Candle to Watch for Messiah -- Wayne Wold
(from "Prelude, Fugue and Variation....", Wold's homage to Franck)

Rorate Caeli -- Jeanne Demessieux

Pastorale on "Wake, Awake, for Night is Flying" -- Wayne Wold

Reprise -- Paul Manz
(organ reflections on "E'en So, Lord Jesus, Quickly Come")

Nun Komm, der Heiden Heiland -- J. S. Bach (Great Eighteen)


I will conclude the program by improvising on "Creator of the Stars of Night"

I have also been asked to serve as the cantor for the Office, and will chant the psalms in alternatim with the congregation. They use the St. Meinrad psalm tones.

~nb

11.22.2005

CONCERT UPDATE: GUEST ORGANIST

One of the requests I was given the other day is that for the concert (and ONLY the concert, thank God) the choir and I be up front. Since the console is in back (but with the mirror I can still well be seen), I had to make a slight personal adjustment.

I was able to acquire a guest organist yesterday who will play from the back, while I conduct up front. The organist is Mr. Reuel Gifford. Reuel and I go back - WAYYYYYYYYYY back - like about 30 years! You see, in the fall of 1975, I joined the choir of boys and men at Holy Trinity Church in Central Falls, RI, which was directed by Reuel. I was only 11 years old then - singing tenor - YES, tenor, while 12- and 13 year-olds were still singing with the treble boys and 15- and 16-year-old guys were still singing alto. It was through Reuel that I got to learn the really good stuff - Mozart's Ave Verum, Stainer's God So Loved the World, Holst's gorgeous arrangement of Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence, etc. It was the first time that I had gotten to know a better tune for Away in a Manger (CRADLE SONG, by Kirkpatrick), and the beloved O Little Town of Bethlehem to FOREST GREEN. There was a Gloria by Mozart that still sticks to me to this day. However, I cannot recall which Mass it was from.

Reuel left for Worcester, MA, in the beginning of 1976. His predecessor was Mr. Kevin Valentine, who eventually became my organ instructor for a brief period in 1987. I ceased my lessons upon the birth of my daughter Jessica. In 1988, Reuel came back to RI, where I got to meet him again, not as a chorister this time, but as a colleague and friend. He and I have been friends since. He is currently organist and choirmaster at St. Mary's Church in Providence. The organ there is a three-manual 27-rank Kilgen - probably the best sounding Kilgen in Rhode Island. He also directs a choir there called Pro Cantare.

It is my great pleasure to welcome my good friend and colleague, Reuel Gifford, to the console at Holy Ghost, as part of our concert!

+In Christ,
BMP

11.20.2005

CHRISTMAS OVERKILL

OK - this rant is off topic from the normal scope of this blog, but...

When I'm not in church or writing music, my radio will be on one of five classic rock/oldies stations. Or my wife will be on one of two soft rock stations or the local country station. Or my kids will be tuned to Radio Disney.

BUT...
Ever have one of your favorite radio stations turn around a week before Thanksgiving Day and start playing the tackiest Christmas music 24/7 every day until Christmas? At one time, we had Christmas records if we wanted to hear Christmas music. Radio stations maybe played one or two within a one-hour span. Not exactly overkill.

But when you have a station that plays stuff like "It's the most wonderful time of the year" by Andy Williams, about as many trashed versions of stuff like "Silver Bells" and "Sleigh Ride" as you can think of TWENTY FOUR/SEVEN - now THAT'S overkill.

I'm not trying to be a Scrooge here. After all, I am Roman Catholic, and I do have plenty of Christmas spirit to go around, both in a sacred and secular sense, believe me. But can we at least get out of Ordinary Time first before playing silly Christmas ditties that sound worse than the crap you hear over the speakers at the mall?

Note that this trend up this neck of the woods only started emerging about four years ago. So far, I've boycotted two stations until Christmas is done. In the meantime, I'll still be rehearsing Christmas music with the choir for the Christmas Masses, and for the concert. I'll still be putting up my tree with the wife and kids a week after Thanksgiving (at least we'll be in Advent). On Christmas Eve, I play WCRB-FM (102.5 - a Boston classical station) and listen to some of the greatest carol arrangements ever recorded - some by orchestras, some by smaller ensembles, many by choirs (a sizeable amount by choirs of boys and men, with organ, sometimes brass).

One of the greatest Christmas albums of all time was released in the 1960's, and is still being sold as a CD on many internet stores. It's The Glorious Sound of Christmas by Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orchestra, featuring the Temple University Concert Choir, directed by Robert Page (my father, 24 years deceased, was Robert Page, but not THAT Robert Page). My parents had this album when I was a youngun. The arrangements on all 14 tracks are about as good as they come.

Side One:
Hark! the Herald Angels Sing (with choir)
O Little Town of Bethlehem (instrumental)
Joy to the World (instrumental)
O Holy Night (with choir)
O Come, O Come, Emmanuel (instrumental)
God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen (instrumental)
Ave Maria (Schubert/instrumental, with choir on part of it on "aah")

Side Two:
O Come, All Ye Faithful (with choir)
The First Noel (instrumental)
Deck the Halls (instrumental)
O Sanctissima (instrumental)
The Worship of God in Nature (Beethoven/with choir)
O Come, Little Children (instrumental)
Silent Night (with choir)

I love Christmas. I just don't like the tacky secular overkill.

Peace,
BMP

MUSIC for THANKSGIVING DAY and I ADVENT at HOLY GHOST CHURCH

NOVEMBER 24, 2005 - THANKSGIVING DAY
Mass at 8:00 AM (Me, myself, and I)

Introit hymn: ST. GEORGE'S WINDSOR - Come, ye thankful people, come (Missalette, #35)
Responsorial Psalm: Alstott - Blessed be the name of the Lord for ever (Missalette, page 88)
Alleluia: Murray
Offertory hymn: DIX - For the beauty of the earth (Music Issue, #521)
Sanctus, Mysterium, Amen: Peloquin - Mass of the Bells
Lord's Prayer: most likely said, not sung (I'll leave it up to Father)
Agnus Dei: Peloquin - Mass of the Bells
Communion hymn: Peloquin - Faith, hope, and love (from "Lyric Liturgy")
Recessional hymn: NUN DANKET - Now thank we all our God (Missalette, #26)

NOTES ABOUT THE MUSIC:
The communion proper listed in the missalette is "O give thanks to the Lord for he is good, for his love is everlasting". This is actually the first of five verses based on Psalm 136 that go with the antiphon: Faith, hope, and love: let these endure among you, and the greatest of these is love. The piece comes from "Lyric Liturgy", a 1974 gem written by C. Alexander Peloquin.

NOVEMBER 27, 2005 - I ADVENT
Saturday Mass at 4:30 with cantor / Sunday Masses at 7:30, 9:00 (both me, myself, and I), and 10:30 with choir

All numbers below are in the Missalette.
Introit hymn: VENI, VENI, EMMANUEL - O come, O come, Emmanuel (#19)
Penitential Rite: parrot Father
Responsorial Psalm: Tone 2 - Lord, make us turn to you, let us see your face and we shall be saved.
Alleluia: Chant Mode VI
Offertory hymn: CONDITOR ALME SIDERUM - Creator of the stars of night (#35)
Sanctus: Mass XVIII (in Latin)
Mysterium Fidei: Mortem tuam annuntiamus, Domine
Amen: single Amen with slurred last syllable
Lord's Prayer: Sacramentary chant (in English)
Agnus Dei: Mass XVIII (in Latin)
Communion hymn: SALVE REGINA/adapted by Schutte - Christ, circle 'round us (#37)
Recessional hymn: STUTTGART - Come, O long-expected Jesus (#20)

ABOUT THE MUSIC:
All the hymns today are pretty much seasonally based. One newer piece we're using is, believe it or not, by Dan Schutte. "Christ, circle 'round us" is by far one of his best pieces - wedding his phrasing of the "O" Antiphons with an adaptation of the beloved Mode V chant "Salve Regina".

Today is the beginning of: 1) Readings from Year B; 2) the new missalettes - these run from I Advent through V Lent; 3) the 2006 music issue; 4) use of the acclamation "Mortem tuam annuntiamus, Domine, et tuam resurrectionem confitemur, donec venias". This acclamation is one of three in the Latin Sacramentary. Though the bulk of the Latin and chant ordinaries will be used one Sunday a month still, we will use the Mortem Tuam straight through Holy Week.

Nick's music list for I Advent at St. Patrick's Cathedral is already posted (he's way ahead of me this week LOL).

FINALLY - MARK THIS DATE!
Wednesday, December 28, 2005 - 7:00 PM
The Choir of Holy Ghost Church will put on its first concert under my baton. Though mainly carols, there will be a few choral pieces as well, both in and out of season. Possibly some organ music too. Also featured will be some select instrumentalists from the Tiverton High School Band, assembled by our sacristan Nick Fleming, who is also a trumpeter. Music listing will come later on.

+In Christ,
BMP

11.18.2005

A BRIGHT IDEA THAT CAN GO GOOD!

I left this comment in response to this article by Shawn Tribe on "The New Liturgical Movement":

First a snip of a comment by Andrew:

"But, how about one for every diocese in the US? in the world? And what if all of these Societies in the US came together to put together a truly Catholic hymnbook with Gregorian chant, etc.?"

To which I replied:

Doubtful it will happen, but definitely a great idea. That's why it most likely won't happen. *sigh*

I can picture the best of Worship II, the best of Collegeville, the best of Adoremus, and of course, the Gregorian Missal, as a major part of such a project.

It might just take PEOPLE LIKE US, yes, us, the authors, readers, and supporters of this here blog and others like it, to take up such a project. Then we, as a group, could take finished product thereof right to the BCL for approval.It's an idea anyways. :-D

Another commenter mentioned that he had started a "sacred music society" in his parish. Response amongst his parishioners is a bit slow for now, but the pastor is supportive. Maybe with a cool catchy name it will attract. There's the "Holy Name Society", the "Men of St. Joseph", etc. How about it? The SAINT CECILIA SOCIETY!

At the end of each rehearsal, our choir prays together the prayer "Come, Holy Spirit, come by the means of the powerful intercession of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, your well-beloved spouse", along with the Hail Mary and the Glory Be to the Father. To finish I lead a mini-litany:

St. Cecilia: pray for us.
St. Benedict: pray for us.
St. Augustine: pray for us.
St. Gregory: pray for us.
St. Basil: pray for us.
St. Michael: pray for us.
St. Pius X: pray for us.

Cecilia, of course, is the patroness of sacred music. Benedict, named after our Pope, and we all know his views on liturgy. Augustine coined the phrase Those who sing, pray twice. The remaining four all have hymnals named after them. Only the St. Michael Hymnal is a post-Conciliar hymnal, but, on the most part, a very good one.

Prayer is always helpful. How about the Novena for Renewal of the Sacred Liturgy?

Peace,
BMP

Advent I at the Cathedral

The Cathedral Parish of St. Patrick
Harrisburg, PA

Advent I

Prelude: Pastorale on "Wake, Awake, for Night is Flying" -- Wayne Wold

Entrance: The Advent of Our King / ST. THOMAS (WILLIAMS)

Act of Penitence Form C (led by cantor)from "Advent Wreath Service" by John Schiavone

Psalm 80: Lord, Make Us Turn to You... -- Gelineau

Gospel Acc: Alleluia VII -- Berthier

Offertory: Creator of the Stars of Night / CONDITOR ALME SIDERUM

Offertory Anthem (9:30): "E'en So, Lord Jesus, Quickly Come" -- Paul Manz

Sanctus: Mass XVIII

Acclamation and Amen: Corpus Christi Mass -- Proulx

Agnus Dei: Mass XVIII

Communion: My Soul in Stillness Waits

Recessional: City of God

Postlude: Nun Komm, der Heiden Heiland -- Johann Pachelbel

"VATICAN EXPRESS" CARD?

"Don't leave Rome without it!" says the Curt Jester, in his latest of great parodies.

BMP

11.16.2005

THE NEW LITURGICAL MOVEMENT

I urge all readers to check out The New Liturgical Movement. Recent additions include updates on the new Mass translation progress, an interview with Cardinal Arinze which is impeccable, and an article on the new FSSP church near Indianapolis - Saint Cecilia of Rome.

The new organist and choirmaster at St. Cecilia's is Chris Sedlak, a good friend of both Nick's and mine. In fact, I had the pleasure of meeting Chris last year on my way to southwest Missouri (I was down there for a job interview just days before I was hired at Holy Ghost). We got together at (of all places, but I wanted to see one because there are none here) a SONIC restaurant in Indy.

On November 22, the feast day of Saint Cecilia, the one-manual tracker organ at St. Cecilia is being blessed and dedicated, followed by High Mass. If you're in Indy, give yourself a treat and hear Chris, and be awed at the beauty of High Mass, while honoring the Patroness of Sacred Music. You won't regret it!

Peace,
BMP

11.15.2005

ADDENDUM to the last THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

OK all - here's part of the chant/Latin spoof of Hail Mary/Gentle Woman that was concocted. I somewhat remember the chant adaptation I had on the Gentle Woman part, but our pal Jason had done the Latin text - which I can't remember to save my behind.

So, here's the Hail Mary (Ave Maria) part anyways.

Peace,
BMP

ANOTHER EPISODE of THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

Round 2 of THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY - Christus Vincit Style!

The Good: Ave Maria (chant, Abt, Arcadelt, Victoria - pick one - they're all good!)
The Bad: Hail Mary/Gentle Woman
The Ugly: Elvis Presley doing a rendition of Hail Mary/Gentle Woman that medleys with "I Can't Help Falling in Love with You" (they're both in D major in most books - they're both in that 50's rock-ballad style 6/8 time - and they can both put you to sleep!)

Our Louisiana buddy (whom Nick and I both know on several boards and good friends with) once did a translation of Gentle Woman, to which I took Landry's melody and transformed it into this cool chant tune. My copy got lost in the big Pawtucket mill fire two years ago from yesterday.

BMP

IT'S ABOUT DANG TIME

Yes - as reported in The New Liturgical Movement - NPM is FINALLY promoting chant.
It's definitely a turn into the right direction, finally!

Read: Triumph of Hope at NPM

BMP

CONCERNED ABOUT "NEW TRADITIONAL MUSIC"

Gary Penkala at CanticaNOVA quells the worries of the frustrated church musician in fear for his/her job in the latest feedback reply: Concerned About "New Traditional Music". A really good primer for the musician facing "The Reform of the Reform".

Enjoy!

BMP

11.14.2005

TWO NEW LINKS ADDED ON THE SIDEBAR

Nick and I have taken the liberty of adding two new links on our sidebar.

Last night, I added St. Patrick Cathedral in Harrisburg, where Nick (as he mentioned in his introductory post) is the newly-appointed Director of Liturgical Music. It is fitting that his parish gets added to the blog links. Now - if I was only a fly on the wall to hear the Rutter The Lord is my Shepherd at the Cathedral *sigh*!

Today, Nick added the Church of St. John Cantius in Chicago. This is THE parish that REALLY has something for everybody, and NO! I don't mean "cathedral and pilgrim styles". On a typical weekend schedule they have three Novus Ordo Masses (one in Latin, two in English), and two Latin Tridentine Masses (one Low, one High). Their current weekend schedule is:

Saturday: 5:00 PM - Novus Ordo in English
Sunday: 7:30 AM - Tridentine Low Mass
- 9:00 AM - Novus Ordo in English
- 11:00 AM - Novus Ordo in Latin
- 12:30 PM - Tridentine High Mass

There are several choirs and the music is top notch. Check it out!

+In Christ,
BMP

11.13.2005

THE EVOLUTION OF "CHRISTUS VINCIT"

Pictured here are three settings of the beloved antiphon Christus vincit, Christus regnat, Christus imperat!

The first is the Chant setting. Since I don't yet have software for chant notation, I had to go into my regular music software, which can do shape notes, and eliminate stems, but I get a five-line staff. So, I had to go to the basic "Paint" tool (thank God I can also save as a .tif), eliminate the fifth line, then draw the chant clef. It's obviously not a Liber Usualis quality layout, but it's ok for now.

Second is a more modern metrical setting found in many hymnals, including the St. Gregory Hymnal and Catholic Choir Book.

Third is my own setting, written in the fall of 1999, while serving at Holy Name of Jesus Church in Providence. In an attempt to return this antiphon into the Post-Conciliar Church in North America, I added versicles to Psalm 93 (92), in Latin. This is the setting we'll be using at Holy Ghost Church for the Solemnity of Christ the King.

Peace,
BMP

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

In the style of our good friend Matthew Meloche up in The Dusty Choir Loft, here's a new good-bad-ugly scenario:

The Good: Come, Ye Thankful People, Come (which has the line "God our maker doth provide for our wants to be supplied")

The Bad: Table of Plenty (which has the line "Gard will pro-vahd for AWLLLLL that we neeeeeeeed")

The Ugly: Hearing "Table of Plenty" sung by the cast of "Hee Haw"

Peace,
BMP

Greetings, Bloggers

Greetings, Friends in cyber-space.

My name is Nick Basehore, and I am the newly-appointed Director of Liturgical Music at St. Patrick Cathedral in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. I have become good friends with Brian through several music/liturgy fora, and he has asked me to join the Christus Vincit blog as a contributor. As I am only several weeks into my new position in Harrisburg, my posts here will be limited to liturgical plans for the time being. Again, thank you, Brian, for welcoming me here.

God bless you all.
~nb

TEAM BLOG

If all goes right, CHRISTUS VINCIT will become a team blog. I have invited two colleagues, one from Louisiana who is a really good friend of mine, the other is a cathedral music director. You'll see them soon. Once they arrive, I'll give more detail.

This explains why I slightly altered the blog's subtitle.

+In Christ,
BMP

MUSIC for CHRIST THE KING at HOLY GHOST CHURCH

NOVEMBER 20, 2005 - CHRIST THE KING (Sunday XXXIV)

Introit hymn: FESTIVAL CANTICLE - This is the feast of victory for our God (#598)
Gloria: Peloquin - Mass of the Bells
Psalm: Gelineau - My Shepherd is the Lord (#749)
Alleluia: Murray (verse to tone 8)
Offertory hymn: ST. GEORGE'S WINDSOR - Hail, Redeemer, King divine (#736)
Sanctus/Mysterium/Per Ipsum: Peloquin - Mass of the Bells
Lord's Prayer: Sacramentary chant
Agnus: Bells
Communion choral responsory: Page - Christus Vincit
Recessional hymn: ICH GLAUB AN GOTT - To Jesus Christ, our sov'reign King (#732)

ABOUT THE DAY'S MUSIC:
The last Sunday of Ordinary Time is this Sunday - the Solemnity of Christ the King. Those who celebrate the Tridentine (1962 Missal) Mass celebrated this lovely feast on the last Sunday of October.
The Introit for the day is (according to the Roman Missal) "The Lamb who was slain is worthy to receive strength and divinity...", which appears as verse 1 of the day's opening hymn This is the feast of victory.
The Grail/Gelineau settings and translations of Responsorial Psalms are approved for use in the United States. Those texts, and the translations provided in the Lectionary for Mass (courtesy of the ICEL), are the ONLY translations approved for use as Responsorial Psalms. In this case, we are using the appointed My Shepherd is the Lord, nothing indeed shall I want. If one MUST use Shepherd me, O God beyond my wants, (and I pray for those who do by force) please - put it somewhere else in the Mass (Offertory, Communion).
Hail Redeemer, King Divine is being repeated for this week, as we enter its tune ST. GEORGE'S WINDSOR into our parish repertoire.
Christus Vincit, from my own pen, is an interesting setting. It incorporates key changes between antiphon and verse (G lydian mode for the antiphon, E major for the verses). The classic antiphon "Christus vincit, Christus regnat, Christus imperat!" is wedded with verses in Latin based on Psalm 93 (92 if you're using the Latin Vulgate).
Finally, the recessional, To Jesus Christ, our sovereign King, is a beloved Catholic classic just about anywhere, and perfectly fit for the feast.

THE LITTLE FLOWER IS IN OUR CHOIR AREA!
Some great news! In our old church, there was a statue of St. Therese de Lisieux (aka St. Theresa of the Little Flower) standing to the right of the altar. The old church was destroyed by fire in the late 1980's. That statue of St. Therese has been beautifully restored and returned to our present church, and placed prominently in the choir area. This is a very beautiful recovery, if you ask me. Incidentally, it was said once by my grandmother that my mom (also named Theresa) was named after the Little Flower. It's great to see a modern edifice be adorned with some great tradition. I'm sure there is more to come.

I'm done torturing you all for now. (LOL)

+In Christ,
BMP

11.12.2005

OH NOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!

Compliments of Daniel Vitz:

Committed to an Institute: Return of the St. Louis Jesuits?!

Coming soon to a music issue near you! (Brian chokes here!)

BMP

NEW COMMENTING POLICY

Greetings.

Thanks to a new feature in Blogspot, I have re-activated the allowing of anonymous comments. However, all comments will now be moderated.

I will allow ALL comments relating to the blog and the subject matter that both agree and disagree with what I've written about. However, any spam will be rejected before it even hits the comment board. This is all thanks to Blogspot's new moderation tool, where I receive the comments first, then approve or reject.

Therefore, your comment may not be posted right away, but it will be posted once I receive it. Again, you can still disagree and it will be posted. I'm not selective like certain message boards. Only spam will be deep-sixed.

Thank you for your understanding.

+In Christ,
BMP

SOME NEWS ON THE NEW MASS TRANSLATION

This in from the Catholic News Service!

Do we buy our new hymnals now so that they become obsolete in less than two years? Nah! Hold off. One of my message boards was taking wagers as to who was going to be the first to produce a product with the new translation. We're pretty much betting on the publishers that already specialize in throwaway products.

With all this wait going on, 23 months is not a long time. Hang tight folks. Pope Benedict XVI is going to take us for a wonderful liturgical ride!

Peace
BMP

11.09.2005

THE WORSHIP OF GOD IN NATURE: THE DRY RUN

Last night's choir rehearsal was impressive. We started Beethoven's The Worship of God in Nature (aka The Heavens are Telling). For a choir that, on the most part, had never seen nor heard the piece, I can't begin to tell you how nicely the dry run came out. In fact, when CCD coordinators Peter and Elaine came in, they got to hear it and could not believe that last night's rehearsal was the FIRST time the choir has tried it.

Scheduled time for the Beethoven: 4 Advent (December 18), at 10:30 Mass, most likely at the Offertory.

Two originals that will be coming up:
Christus Vincit (with Psalm 93) - Christ the King (November 20), at Communion (all Masses - this one is a responsory)
Rejoice in the Lord always (with Psalm 85) - 3 Advent (December 11), at 10:30 Mass, most likely as the Choral Introit, just minutes before Mass, or as the Offertory.

This choir just keeps getting better and better!

+In Christ,
BMP

11.06.2005

WHAT *REALLY* IS CONTEMPORARY???

Ever ponder this question? What REALLY is contemporary?

You always see that debate amongst Catholic music circuits: "traditional versus contemporary". You always see that help wanted ad in NPM's website from some parish looking for a music director that's well-versed in both "traditional and contemporary styles of music". Or there's that parish who has one Mass that used to be known as the "folk Mass" that's now called the "contemporary Mass".

But is contemporary really a style/genre/idiom? Or is it a time frame?

Consider the works of fine modern composers like Richard Proulx, John Rutter, and the late Alexander Peloquin (+1997). All three, Peloquin especially, did many fine works with modern harmonies (whether it be tensions or just plain cool-sounding dissonances), based mainly on the organ. Does that make it traditional, because they're organ/orchestral/choral-based?

Or even consider the story of the familiar Christmas carol "Silent Night". Due to the organ cutting out, they needed some quick music, and had a guitar to fill the void - thus the birth of "Silent Night". Obviously, it's no longer contemporary, despite using a guitar to write (and play) the long-beloved carol.

A former worship department head in my diocese, a priest, did a big flyer in the mid 1980's promoting the then-forthcoming inaugural edition of GIA's "Gather" songbook (I call it a "songbook" and not a "hymnal", because, in my opinion, there are really no "hymns" in it). Despite his big brag about the book, he did use a couple of terms that may sound better in terms of "style wars". Those terms are "cathedral style", which pertains generally to organ-based music in the "Worship" and "Adoremus" hymnals (which really ARE hymnals), and "pilgrim style", which pertains to the happy-clappy fare in "Glory and Praise" and "Gather". Gather really caters to the pilgrim style! the priest proclaims.

"Traditional/contemporary" or "cathedral/pilgrim"? You be the judge. Let me know whatcha think! :-)

+In Christ,
BMP

MUSIC for SUNDAY XXXIII at HOLY GHOST CHURCH

NOVEMBER 13, 2005 - SUNDAY XXXIII

10:30 Introit: Tone 8 - The Lord said: My plans for you are peace and not disaster...
Processional hymn: ST. GEORGE'S WINDSOR - Come, ye thankful people, come (Missalette, #35)
Gloria: Peloquin - Mass of the Bells
Ps: Gelineau - Happy are those who fear the Lord
Alle: Murray
Offertory hymn: KING'S WESTON - At the name of Jesus (Music Issue, #741)
Sanctus, Mysterium Fidei, and Per Ipsum: Peloquin- Mass of the Bells
Lord's Prayer: chant, English
Agnus: Peloquin - Mass of the Bells
Communion hymn: Lafferty - Seek ye first the kingdom of God (Music Issue, #447)
10:30 Proper: Tone 8 - Lord, you have given five talents to me...
Recessional hymn: HYMN TO JOY - Joyful, joyful, we adore thee (Music Issue, #536)

SOME NOTES ON THE MUSIC:
The antiphon to today's Introit is the translation in the Roman Missal (Sacramentary), while the antiphon for the Communion Proper is translated from the Gregorian Missal. Meanwhile, the second verse of the Communion hymn (Seek ye first) is a paraphrase of the Roman Missal's second option of the Proper.

The opening (Processional) hymn today is the same tune as last week's opening with a different text.

We also started teaching some Latin this past weekend that we will be using starting with 1 Advent (November 27). That is, the Memorial Acclamation "Mortem tuam annuntiamus, Domine, et resurrectionem tuam confitemur: Donec venias." Response was "ok", got better at each Mass (thus, the 10:30 response, less the choir, was far better than the response at the Saturday 4:30). We'll be reviewing this acclamation the next couple of Sundays, so we can hit it head-on for Advent. "Solemn Sunday" (normally the Last Sunday of the Month) will be, coincedentally, 1 Advent.

Our next full-blown anthem will be on Christ the King (November 20) - my own "Christus Vincit" setting, with Latin verses based on Psalm 93 (92). I will also eventually be adding in "The Worship of God in Nature" by Beethoven.

We're looking to have a choral concert, with some of the band from Tiverton High School. Tentative date is Wednesday, December 28, 2005, at 7:00 PM. More on this as it develops.

+In Christ,
BMP