Monday, December 31, 2007

THE ENTRANCE AND COMMUNION ANTIPHONS

Dr. Paul Ford, whose work for the Church I greatly admire, posted an "emendation" to a couple of sections of the most recent General Instruction of the Roman Missal submitted by the U.S. Bishops. This is in light of concerns about the Entrance and Communion antiphons as provided in the Roman Missal. It turns out that...

Recent research, confirmed by unofficial discussions with officials of the Holy See during the past several years, has made clear that the antiphons of the Order of Mass were never intended to be sung, but are provided without notation to be recited whenever the Graduale Romanum or another song is not sung. The antiphons of the Missale Romanum, which differ substantially from the sung antiphons of the Roman Gradual, were never intended to be sung.

I remember this coming up in conversation somewhere, but I forget where. Even most missalettes knew enough to print under "Entrance Antiphon" and "Communion Antiphon" that "when a processional chant or hymn is sung, the antiphon of the day is omitted."

On the Musica Sacra message board thread on which Dr. Ford posted the .pdf, I took the liberty of asking him:,

Would one still be free to use the Graduale propers or even a translation thereof? I would at least hope anyways.
And what about the priority of Lectionary vs. Graduale when singing the "intervening chants" during the Liturgy of the Word?


I got this reply from Dr. Ford, which I found very helpful and thank him for:

Yes, Brian, one would be free to use the Graduale propers or even a translation thereof. That is what we in the Collegeville Composers Group did in our Psallite project for The Liturgical Press.
It seems to be, however, that the Lectionary has priority over Graduale when singing the "intervening chants" during the Liturgy of the Word. This is because the Lectionary of the Mass of Paul VI was composed on a different principle than was the lectionary of the Mass of Saint Pius V.


This will help me greatly in compositional endeavors in the very near future.
Peace,
BMP

A DAY IN THE LIFE AT THE CAT CHORALE CAMP

Well, folks, here's what's been happening --- my cat chorale has been expanding! I've been putting them through a rigorous training camp. However, they can be about as mischievous as, let's say, Alvin and the Chipmunks.

Here are some samples of what a cat choir camp is like:


If anyone says "You stink!" after Mass, here's why.


This cat is studying organ repair, and is practicing the art of contortionism. You have to be a professional contortionist to get into some of those cases.


The all-new meaning to "It ain't over till the fat lady sings!"


The "sing on your back" exercise to help hit certain notes.


Stretching and singing, warming up for a certain religious misedumacation congress performance.


Trying to stay dry from the rain during outdoor activity. (OR: Finding a place to hide while cutting liturgical dance class)


This guy wasn't so lucky.


No, that is not Lucy Carroll's Churchmouse on this cat's head. Churchmouse knows better.


Perhaps a good scream for help would expand this cat's soprano range.


All are welllllllllllllcome, ALL are welllllllllllllllcome... Hold on, let me call my friend. RAAAAAAAALPH!

Happy, blessed, and snarky New Year to all our readers, listeners, viewers, etc.
Peace,
BMP

Sunday, December 30, 2007

A FRIENDLY REMINDER

brought to you by "O Come, Let Us Adore Him"

For some reason, up in these parts, many parishes still have a tendency of using O come, let us adore him / Venite, Adoremus as a memorial acclamation. Now, I must say that the ditty in question is, well, not really a ditty, but the refrain of a beautifully-written Christmas carol. However, it is NOT a memorial acclamation.

Let us proclaim the mystery of faith.

The "mystery of faith", mysterium fidei, is not the Lord's birth, though we are in the season to celebrate such. The mystery of faith is what we recall every time we come to Mass - the Eucharist, our Lord's Holy Sacrifice of His Body and Blood, his passion, death, and resurrection.

- Dying you destroyed our death, rising you restored our life; Lord Jesus, come in glory.
- When we eat this bread and drink this cup, we proclaim your death, Lord Jesus, until you come in glory.
- Lord, by your cross and resurrection, you have set us free; you are the Savior of the world.

(and I guess the add-on, Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again.)

Don't get me wrong - I love the hymn Adeste Fideles, but in its rightful place.
Peace,
BMP

MUSIC FOR HOLY MASS

St. John the Baptist, Pawtucket, RI
Feast of the Holy Family, December 30, 2007

I went to the 9:30 Mass again this morning. Paul can really get some nice sounds out of that organ!

O come, all ye faithful..."Adeste Fideles"
- (I don't know where he got the intro from, but it was gorgeous!)
Blessed are those who fear the Lord...Alstott
Alleluia...Alstott
- (the chant-like one in A-flat. Of all the Alleluias usually included in that Respond and Acclaim book, apart from the O Filii et Filiae alleluia, which is always good, especially at Easter, this one is by far the best!)
Away in a Manger...Mueller
- (I still think Kirkpatrick's Cradle Song is better, but Murray's Mueller is a fine tune as well. BTW, don't forget to check out the poll I have on the CVA Message Boards - it's in the CVA #113 thread.)
Mass of Creation...Haugen
What Child is this..."Greensleeves"
Angels we have heard on high..."Gloria"

Peace,
BMP

Saturday, December 29, 2007

CHRISTUS VINCIT ANYWHERE! 114



You can listen below, or save the file by clicking here. (38:59/35.7 MB)
Almost a couple of years ago, we "whitelisted" the good music of OCP's 2006 Breaking Bread hymnal. Today we embark on a brand-spankin'-new "white list" - GIA's newest hymnal, Gather Comprehensive, Second Edition.

You'll love our new detergent in our intro!

We also offer a congratulatory "shout out" to the most recent additions to the SQPN network:
Catholic Underground, Catholic Moments, Catholic Hack, On the U, iPadre

Feasts for the Week:
St. Sylvester I; Mary, Mother of God (traditional feast: Circumcision of Our Lord);
World Day of Prayer for Peace; SS. Basil the Great and Gregory Nazianzen;
Holy Name of Jesus; St. Elizabeth Ann Seton; St. Telesphorus; St. John Neumann;
Epiphany. For more information: New Advent Website.

Suggestion Box: Mary, Mother of God and Epiphany.
For more info: CanticaNOVA Planning Pages - Mary, Mother of God, Epiphany

Music: Not So Silent Night, by Charlie Crowe, courtesy of Podsafe
Top Ten List: Top Ten New Year's Resolutions by Shamus for 2008, brought to you by Cowbell Hero

Additional Links:
Daily Breakfast, Rosary Army, Catholic: Under the Hood,
CyberHymnal entry for From East to West, from Shore to Shore,
Oremus Hymnal entry for Virgin-Born, We Bow before Thee,
Listen to There Shall a Star from Jacob Come Forth

Nominate/vote:
2008 Blogger's Choice Awards Main Page
Best Religion Blog (for Christus Vincit - the BLOG!); Best Podcast (for CVA/CVTV)

CVA Interactive Corner

The Christus Vincit White List II, Part 1

You can listen below, or save the file by clicking here. (38:59/35.7 MB)
Almost a couple of years ago, we "whitelisted" the good music of OCP's 2006 Breaking Bread hymnal. Today we embark on a brand-spankin'-new "white list" - GIA's newest hymnal, Gather Comprehensive, Second Edition.

You'll love our new detergent in our intro!

We also offer a congratulatory "shout out" to the most recent additions to the SQPN network:
Catholic Underground, Catholic Moments, Catholic Hack, On the U, iPadre

Feasts for the Week:
St. Sylvester I; Mary, Mother of God (traditional feast: Circumcision of Our Lord);
World Day of Prayer for Peace; SS. Basil the Great and Gregory Nazianzen;
Holy Name of Jesus; St. Elizabeth Ann Seton; St. Telesphorus; St. John Neumann;
Epiphany. For more information: New Advent Website.

Suggestion Box: Mary, Mother of God and Epiphany.
For more info: CanticaNOVA Planning Pages - Mary, Mother of God, Epiphany

Music: Not So Silent Night, by Charlie Crowe, courtesy of Podsafe
Top Ten List: Top Ten New Year's Resolutions by Shamus for 2008, brought to you by Cowbell Hero

Additional Links:
Daily Breakfast, Rosary Army, Catholic: Under the Hood,
CyberHymnal entry for From East to West, from Shore to Shore,
Oremus Hymnal entry for Virgin-Born, We Bow before Thee,
Listen to There Shall a Star from Jacob Come Forth

Nominate/vote:
2008 Blogger's Choice Awards Main Page
Best Religion Blog (for Christus Vincit - the BLOG!); Best Podcast (for CVA/CVTV)

CVA Interactive Corner

Friday, December 28, 2007

THIS "CHRISTMAS CLASSIC" HITS HOME

OK - any of you West Coast folk ever listen to Bob Rivers on the radio? Bob's been in Seattle for a bit now - KZOK 102.5 FM is his station. I remember him when he did the Bob and Zip Show here in southern New England a couple of decades back (107.3 FM WAAF Worcester/Boston, or as they pronounce it here, "Wistah/Bahstin"). Of course, when Bob went west, he took his "Twisted Tunes" with him (we still have Tom Doyle's "Tom's Townie Tunes" - just as funny).

I stumbled on to this one, pretty much sounds like my current work status. I found this one quite funny (well, not my current work status, but the song).

For the sake of copyright respect for Bob Rivers and KZOK-FM, I'll leave only links...

Lyrics / Audio

Enjoy!
Peace,
BMP

Thursday, December 27, 2007

MY THOUGHTS EXACTLY ON CHRISTMAS

An excellent post on the secularism and consumerism that has eaten up Christmas and simply written it off as "holiday" comes from Dymphna's Well.

Excerpt:
I shudder to think what our more "modern" Christmas songs are telling us. "Grandma Got Run Over By a Reindeer"? "Santa Baby"? Christmas, like Christianity in general is now something to be put down and made fun of, like the picked-on kid at school.

As Boniface says, "this secular Christmas music exposes how bankrupt our culture is..."

Oh.

No wonder we're depressed. If we don't celebrate the birth of Christ, we are forced to celebrate "Blatant Consumer Day", or perhaps, "Depressing Nostalgia Day", by shopping until we drop and then running to the stores the next day to take it all back, because its not what we wanted.

Boniface, btw, has an excellent post in his blog, Unam Sanctam Catholicam, which Dymphna's post attributes.

All this pretty much sums up much of what I've been trying to say all along.
Peace,
BMP

Tuesday, December 25, 2007

MIDNIGHT MASS

Since I was impressed enough with last Sunday's music at St. John the Baptist, I figured I'd go there for Midnight Mass as well (my daughter Jessica came with me this time). When we got into the church, Jessie said to me, "Now THIS is what a church should look like!" (Description of the church here) There was the organist, a trumpet, a flute, and a couple of singers. We got there about "twenty of" (and yes, Midnight Mass was at MIDNIGHT, not 11 PM, not 10 PM --- MIDNIGHT, where it belongs!). I didn't recognize all of the pre-Mass recital, but did manage to catch such titles as Of the Father's Love Begotten (a 3/4 metrical arrangement), Il Est Ne, le Divin Enfant (good choice, especially since there's still some French Canadian blood still looming there), Bring a Torch, Jeanette Isabella, Ding Dong! Merrily on High, and O Come, O Come, Emmanuel (which was the very last). All of these sounded great, especially in a beautiful edifice like St. John's.

At midnight came the 12 bell tolls, followed by the reading (chanting would have really been cool) of the Christmas Proclamation, neither of which I've experienced before, but it was really cool. Procession included a pit stop to the manger to place the Newborn King. Mass music went thus:

Cantique de Noel (one verse each, French, then English)...Adam
O come, all ye faithful..."Adeste Fideles"
Gloria...Schutte/"Mass of God's Promise" (the verses were ok, but since the refrain was an altered text, I wasn't too impressed)
Today is born our Savior, Christ the Lord...Alstott
Celtic Alleluia...Walker/O'Carroll (I'm not a fan of the Celtic Alleluia, but at least Paul made it actually sound decent)
The First Nowell...Trad. English
Mass of Creation...Haugen (Paul and I got talking after Mass and he had found out that I saw the cantor Sunday and told her "excellent selections, except for Mass of Creation, of course", so he said "I hear you don't like Mass of Creation". I then went and told him how I successfully weaned Holy Name out of it, and the interview/audition at Holy Ghost in '04 where the pastor said "If I hear "Mass of Creation" one more time so help me..." - all in fun friendly fire)
It came upon a midnight clear..."Carol"
Silent night, holy night..."Stille Nacht"
Hark! the herald angels sing..."Mendelssohn" (he played it in G - YESSSSSSSSSSS!!!)

Overall, NICE!

In the peace of the newborn King,
BMP

Monday, December 24, 2007

CHRISTMAS GREETINGS!

Now, what good would Christmas be without a snarky greeting?! :))

Merry and blessed Christmas to all our readers, listeners, viewers, etc.
Peace,
BMP (away from the console for the first Christmas in 26 years)

Sunday, December 23, 2007

THE LATEST CRAZE IN LITURGICAL INSTRUMENTS

Religious Mis-Edumacation Congress approved! Enjoy!
(PHT to Fr. Richtsteig)

Peace,
BMP

TODAY I ATTENDED MASS AT

St. John the Baptist, Pawtucket, RI

St. John the Baptist Church, though not the mother church of the city of Pawtucket, nor the most active, but I would say is the most prominent of Pawtucket's twelve Roman Catholic churches.

St. John's was originally built for French Canadians, and for the longest time the church was known by its French name, St. Jean-Baptiste. Many of the cityfolk would simply call it "St. Jean's" (pronouncing "Jean's" in English, like "blue jeans"). With a massive change in demographics in that section of the city, however, the church is known more now by its Spanish name, San Juan el Bautista.

The Romanesque style church is beautiful inside and out. You climb NINE steps to get to the sanctuary. Guest choirs and chori that would perform in concert at the church would use the steps as risers. The Latin inscription down one side of the church and up the other side reads thus (using classical Roman lettering - "V" for "U"):

LAVDATE PVERI DOMINVM, LAVDATE NOMEN DOMINI,
LAVDATE DOMINVM DE COELIS, LAVDATE EVM IN EXCELSIS.
(Praise the Lord, O children, Praise the name of the Lord, -- Psalm 113(112))
(Praise the Lord from the heavens, Praise Him in the highest. -- Psalm 148)

Another inscription above the high altar, contouring the apse:

ECCE AGNVS DEI (Behold the Lamb of God)

Typical Sunday Mass schedule:
Saturday 5:00 PM (English) / 6:30 PM (Spanish)
Sunday 9:30 AM (English) / 11:30 AM (Spanish)

The music, overall, was quite good. Paul Martin has been organist there for quite some time and is quite good. His music selections are primarily in the traditional style, whether it be hymns that have stood the test of time for centuries or modern day music actually geared for organ accompaniment, despite Today's Missal (with Spanish Insert) and Music Issue being the pew book. Today I attended the 9:30 Mass which was no exception.

Here's the music list:

The Advent of our King..."St. Thomas" (Aaron Williams)
Let the Lord enter, he is king of glory...Alstott
- (not one of the best of the Respond and Acclaim Psalm settings, but definitely not one of the worst either)
Advent/Christmas Alleluia...Haas
- (Probably the first, if not only, GOOD work of Haas' I've ever run into. The refrain, anyways. I would have rather used the verse of the day, however, for the verse.)
Lo! how a rose e'er blooming...Es ist ein' ros entsprungen
Mass of Creation...Haugen - (the only blech of the day)
O Holy Mary...Alstott - (by far his BEST work; very nice!)
O come, O come, Emmanuel..."Veni, Veni, Emmanuel" (vv. 7 and 1)

The only thing I would have done differently is extend the intros on the hymns. One short line just isn't enough, IMO. For the opening hymn, which is only short meter (66 86), I would have used a whole verse for an intro. Give the people a chance to hear the tune and open the book. Otherwise, very good!

The organ is a three-manual, 31-rank instrument built by Compagnie Orgues Canadiennes (you guessed it - Canadian Organ Company). I diddled on this organ once a few years back. It's actually an offshoot of Casavant Freres, so I was once told. Dave Sylvester, a good friend of mine, is a former organist there.

Overall, I was very pleased. Musically, it's probably the best that any Pawtucket Catholic parish has!

Peace,
BMP

PS: After Mass, I introduced myself to the curate and gave him the link to a certain podcast. (Ain't I a snark?! tee hee!)

CHRISTUS VINCIT ANYWHERE! 113



You can listen below, or save the file by clicking here. (26:17/24.0 MB)
The last of our series on the "O" Antiphons. Today we are back to the conventional full-length episode.

Today's antiphon: O Emmanuel

Feasts for the Week:
Christmas; St. Stephen; St. John the Evangelist; Holy Innocents;
St. Thomas Becket (St. Thomas of Canterbury); Holy Family.
For more information: New Advent Website.

Suggestion Box: Holy Family. More info: CanticaNOVA Planning Pages for Holy Family.

Music:
O Emmanuel (Chant, Mode II); Veni, Veni, Emmanuel (Chant, Mode I)
Ave Maria (melody by Charles Gounod, placed over a prelude by J.S. Bach), sung by Bob Burger, brought to you by Podsafe.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: A Child Is Born Edition, brought to you courtesy of The "Legend" of the Three Wise Men.
Additional Links: Exsultate Justi at Choral Public Domain Library, cyberhymnal.org
Stop over to our message boards and take the poll under the category for CVA #113.

Nominate/vote:
2008 Blogger's Choice Awards Main Page,
Best Religion Blog (for Christus Vincit - the BLOG!), Best Podcast (for CVA/CVTV)

CVA Interactive Corner

O Emmanuel

You can listen below, or save the file by clicking here. (26:17/24.0 MB)
The last of our series on the "O" Antiphons. Today we are back to the conventional full-length episode.

Today's antiphon: O Emmanuel

Feasts for the Week:
Christmas; St. Stephen; St. John the Evangelist; Holy Innocents;
St. Thomas Becket (St. Thomas of Canterbury); Holy Family.
For more information: New Advent Website.

Suggestion Box: Holy Family. More info: CanticaNOVA Planning Pages for Holy Family.

Music:
O Emmanuel (Chant, Mode II); Veni, Veni, Emmanuel (Chant, Mode I)
Ave Maria (melody by Charles Gounod, placed over a prelude by J.S. Bach), sung by Bob Burger, brought to you by Podsafe.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: A Child Is Born Edition, brought to you courtesy of The "Legend" of the Three Wise Men.
Additional Links: Exsultate Justi at Choral Public Domain Library, cyberhymnal.org
Stop over to our message boards and take the poll under the category for CVA #113.

Nominate/vote:
2008 Blogger's Choice Awards Main Page,
Best Religion Blog (for Christus Vincit - the BLOG!), Best Podcast (for CVA/CVTV)

CVA Interactive Corner

YES, DANCING IS OK...

...if it's not happening at Mass

For those on a certain message board I once frequented, here's the skinny on liturgical dance. (PHT to the Catholic Caveman) The first, dated 1975, comes from the Congregation for the Sacraments and Divine Worship, which is now known as the Congregation for Divine Worship and Discipline of the Sacraments.

DANCE IN THE LITURGY
Congregation for the Sacraments and Divine Worship

Dancing and Worship

The dance has never been made an integral part of the official worship of the Latin Church.

If local churches have accepted the dance, sometimes even in the church building, that was on the occasion of feasts in order to manifest sentiments of joy and devotion. But that always took place outside of liturgical services.

Conciliar decisions have often condemned the religious dance because it conduces little to worship and because it could degenerate into disorders.

However, the same criterion and judgment [that apply to the Eastern Rites] cannot be applied in the western culture.Here dancing is tied with love, with diversion, with profaneness, with unbridling of the senses: such dancing, in general, is not pure.

For that reason it cannot be introduced into liturgical celebrations of any kind whatever: that would be to inject into the liturgy one of the most desacralized and desacralizing elements; and so it would be equivalent to creating an atmosphere of profaneness which would easily recall to those present and to the participants in the celebration worldly places and situations.

Neither can acceptance be had of the proposal to introduce into the liturgy the so-called artistic ballet because there would be presentation here also of a spectacle at which one would assist, while in the liturgy one of the norms from which one cannot prescind is that of participation.

If the proposal of the religious dance in the West is really to be made welcome, care will have to be taken that in its regard a place be found outside of the liturgy, in assembly areas which are not strictly liturgical. Moreover, the priests must always be excluded from the dance.

Second, this, from Francis Cardinal Arinze, whom people from said message board had once referred to the good Cardinal as "clueless".

Has liturgical dance been approved for Masses by your office?

There has never been a document from our Congregation for Divine Worship and Discipline of the Sacraments saying that dance is approved in the Mass.The question of dance is difficult and delicate. However, it is good to know that the tradition of the Latin Church has not known the dance. It is something that people are introducing in the last ten years -- or twenty years. It was not always so. Now it is spreading like wildfire, one can say, in all the continents -- some more than others. In my own continent, Africa, it is spreading. In Asia, it is spreading.

Now, some priests and lay people think that Mass is never complete without dance. The difficulty is this: we come to Mass primarily to adore God -- what we call the vertical dimension. We do not come to Mass to entertain one another. That's not the purpose of Mass. The parish hall is for that.

So all those that want to entertain us -- after Mass, let us go to the parish hall and then you can dance. And then we clap. But when we come to Mass we don't come to clap. We don't come to watch people, to admire people. We want to adore God, to thank Him, to ask Him pardon for our sins, and to ask Him for what we need.

Most dances that are staged during Mass should have been done in the parish hall. And some of them are not even suitable for the parish hall.

I saw in one place -- I will not tell you where -- where they staged a dance during Mass, and that dance was offensive. It broke the rules of moral theology and modesty. Those who arranged it -- they should have had their heads washed with a bucket of holy water! [laughter]

Doesn't sound like someone clueless to me. I'm sure there will be another Religious Mis-edu-ma-cation Congress coming to L.A. pretty soon. Perhaps we should put these two statements from the Vatican and from Cdl. Arinze in a pamphlet and circulate, let's say, truckloads of these, between Los Angeles and Anaheim (the Religious Misedumacation Congress usually has their convention in Anaheim, if I'm not mistaken). Maybe the message board that booted me after I told them off for calling the Cardinal "clueless" (and the national organization that runs said message board) could use such a pamphlet too.

Peace,
BMP

Saturday, December 22, 2007

RUDOLPHUS IS BACK

Rudolphus Rubrinasus returns for a visit!

First a link to the text.

Now a link to the mp3 in Latin (by the choir of St. Bart's NYC),
and the mp3 in Latin and English (by the same choir).

Enjoy!
Peace,
BMP

PS: here's a link to the Latin text for Jingle Bells and Silent Night.

BIG TIME KUDOS

Post number 1700!

In true Drew Carey style, I award a million points to Bass Pro Shops for using the word CHRISTMAS in its latest commercial, as they promote their "Countdown to Christmas" sale on TV. Too bad I don't know any Bass Pro Shops around this neck of the woods. However, I do see the gift cards for them being sold in the friendly neighborhood Cumby's. (Oh, I did find one BPS in Springfield, MO, about three years ago when auditioning in a church there - with a really cool wildlife museum next to it.)

Peace,
BMP

I'VE BEEN MEANING TO ASK A REALLY STUPID QUESTION

Since when did Let There Be Peas and Carrots on Earth and My Favorite Things become Christmas songs? Suddenly I hear these on the radio along with the mix of so-called "holiday favorites". I don't mind so much the latter, but it's by no means a Christmas song, simply a song from a big hit musical (The Sound of Music). The former: well, barf-o-rama!

Peace,
BMP

CHRISTUS VINCIT ANYWHERE! 112



You can listen below, or save the file by clicking here. (9:46/8.9 MB)
This is the shortest, yet last, of our mini-sodes. Tomorrow we'll have the last of the "O Antiphons", but it will be part of a regular full-length episode.

Today's antiphon: O Rex Gentium

Liturgy 911: Papa Joe Ratzi and Frank A. Rinze tackle a "politically correct Christmas Mass".

Music:
O Rex Gentium (Chant, Mode II)
Veni, Veni, Rex Gentium (from Veni, Veni, Emmanuel, Chant, Mode I)

Nominate/vote:
2008 Blogger's Choice Awards Main Page
Best Religion Blog (for Christus Vincit - the BLOG!); Best Podcast (for CVA/CVTV)

CVA Interactive Corner

O Rex Gentium

You can listen below, or save the file by clicking here. (9:46/8.9 MB)
This is the shortest, yet last, of our mini-sodes.

Tomorrow we'll have the last of the "O Antiphons", but it will be part of a regular full-length episode.

Today's antiphon: O Rex Gentium

Liturgy 911: Papa Joe Ratzi and Frank A. Rinze tackle a "politically correct Christmas Mass".

Music:
O Rex Gentium (Chant, Mode II)
Veni, Veni, Rex Gentium (from Veni, Veni, Emmanuel, Chant, Mode I)

Nominate/vote:
2008 Blogger's Choice Awards Main Page
Best Religion Blog (for Christus Vincit - the BLOG!); Best Podcast (for CVA/CVTV)

CVA Interactive Corner

Friday, December 21, 2007

THE "LEGEND" OF THE THREE WISE MEN

...as told by someone not so wise.

The Archbishop of Canterbury said yesterday that the Christmas story of the Three Wise Men was nothing but a 'legend'.

Dr Rowan Williams has claimed there was little evidence that the Magi even existed and there was certainly nothing to prove there were three of them or that they were kings.

Dr Williams said: "Matthew's gospel says they are astrologers, wise men, priests from somewhere outside the Roman Empire, that's all we're really told. It works quite well as legend."

Let's see - Saint Matthew writes:
...behold, Wise Men from the East came to Jerusalem, saying "Where is he who has been born the king of the Jews? For we have seen his star in the East, and have come to worship him."

Sounds to me like those Wise Men were real and not just "ZZ Top doing a FarmAid concert" (apologies to Jeff Foxworthy). But then, that's why the Archbishop of Canterbury is not of the One True Church.

Peace,
BMP

CHRISTUS VINCIT ANYWHERE! 111



You can listen below, or save the file by clicking here. (13:26/12.3 MB)
Here in the fifth of our seven part series reflecting on the "O" Antiphons (and the new shortest in CVA history), we have now officially declared that Krakowska Kielbasa is now the official deli meat of Christus Vincit ANYWHERE!

Today's antiphon: O Oriens

Suggestion Box:
Christmas - Mass during the Day.
For more info, check out the CanticaNOVA Planning Page for Christmas - Mass during the Day.

Music: O Oriens (Chant, Mode II); Veni, Veni, O Oriens (from Veni, Veni, Emmanuel, Mode I)

Nominate/vote:
2008 Blogger's Choice Awards Main Page
Best Religion Blog (for Christus Vincit - the BLOG!); Best Podcast (for CVA/CVTV)

CVA Interactive Corner

O Oriens

You can listen below, or save the file by clicking here. (13:26/12.3 MB)
Here in the fifth of our seven part series reflecting on the "O" Antiphons (and the new shortest in CVA history), we have now officially declared that Krakowska Kielbasa is now the official deli meat of Christus Vincit ANYWHERE!

Today's antiphon: O Oriens

Suggestion Box:
Christmas - Mass during the Day.
For more info, check out the CanticaNOVA Planning Page for Christmas - Mass during the Day.

Music:
O Oriens (Chant, Mode II);
Veni, Veni, O Oriens (from Veni, Veni, Emmanuel, Mode I)

Nominate/vote:
2008 Blogger's Choice Awards Main Page
Best Religion Blog (for Christus Vincit - the BLOG!); Best Podcast (for CVA/CVTV)

CVA Interactive Corner

Thursday, December 20, 2007

CHRISTUS VINCIT ANYWHERE! 110



You can listen below, or save the file by clicking here. (14:19/13.1 MB)
Part four of our seven-part series, reflecting on each "O" Antiphon on the day it appears at Vespers.

Today's antiphon: O Clavis David

Suggestion Box:
Christmas - Mass at Dawn.
For more information, check out the CanticaNOVA Planning Page for Christmas - Mass at Dawn

Music:
O Clavis David (Chant, Mode II);
Veni, Clavis Davidica (from Veni, Veni, Emmanuel, Mode I)

Additional Link: Rosary Army (Congrats on 200 episodes!)

Nominate/vote:
2008 Blogger's Choice Awards Main Page; Best Religion Blog (for Christus Vincit - the BLOG!)
Best Podcast (for CVA/CVTV)

CVA Interactive Corner

CHECK THIS SURVEY OUT

I'm usually not a fan of surveys, but my wife sent me this one and I couldn't resist...
http://www.afa.net/petitions/candidate

The question is: Is it okay for a candidate to wish voters Merry Christmas?

After I clicked my "yes" vote, the up-to-the-minute results came up:
Yes: 29,977 / No: 54

So, should we be "politically correct" for the sake of a measly 54? I think not!
Peace,
BMP

IT'S A MAD MAD MAD MAD iWORLD!

These days there's an "i" for everything. There's the iPod and iTunes. My former boss is the iPadre. Frigidaire has a washer and dryer called iWash and iDry respectively (I yahooed "iWash" and found there's also a car wash system by the same name). So, my wife and my daughter check out the Chipmunks official website, and what do they discover?


You guessed it!

Coming soon: the iSnark! (That'll be the guy who, on the end of each of my CVA/CVTV shows, yells out "Made on a crappy PC!")

Peace,
BMP

Wednesday, December 19, 2007

I'VE REDISCOVERED MY FAVORITE SANDWICH MEAT!

There's a little Polish market just a few blocks from me. They've been open about a year, but just last week I was brave enough to step foot inside.

When I was a teenager, my parents would stop at Central Falls Provision Company in Central Falls, RI, to get most, if not all, of their deli meats. Being a Polish run store (I'm a half-a-Polock, the Polish is on my mom's side, btw), you'd run into such meats as what you see on the left.

As a teen, I simply called it "kielbasa loaf". I figured, "hey, it looks like salami crossed with Canadian bacon, but it tastes like kielbasa." Its true name is Kielbasa Krakowska. Yesterday, I bought the stuff for the first time in twenty-some years, at the little store I mentioned in my opening paragraph. And unlike my peers when I was in junior high and high school who were driven nuts by the smell (they could smell kielbasa a mile away -- HEY PAGE, WHAT IS THAT $&!+???!!!), my wife (French Canadian by blood) and kids (only quarter-Polocks) love it! I have to buy it in two-pound increments when I go get it.

Dare to ask someone in an ordinary supermarket deli in the USA for Kielbasa Krakowska (btw, fellow Polocks around here simply call it "Krako", or perhaps "Krakow", after the city in Poland, for short).

"Krakow" rocks!
Peace,
BMP

THIS GUY GETS IT!

Jeffrey Tucker at NLM finds'em all. Click here for an excellent article on good and bad hymnody by Todd Aglioloro. He REALLY gets it!

Peace,
BMP

CHRISTUS VINCIT ANYWHERE! 109



You can listen below, or save the file by clicking here. (14:49/13.5 MB)
Part three of our seven-part series, reflecting on each "O" Antiphon on the day it appears at Vespers.

Today's antiphon: O Radix Jesse

Suggestion Box:
Christmas - Midnight Mass.
More info: CanticaNOVA Planning Page for Christmas - Midnight Mass

Music:
O Radix Jesse (Chant, Mode II)
Veni, O Jesse Virgula (from Veni, Veni, Emmanuel, Chant, Mode I)

Nominations and voting for the 2008 Blogger's Choice Awards is underway. Christus Vincit - the BLOG! is running in the Best Religion Blog category. CV ANYWHERE! is running in the Best Podcast category. Would you like to vote for us? Please? Pretty please?

CVA Interactive Corner

Tuesday, December 18, 2007

CHRISTUS VINCIT ANYWHERE! 108



You can listen below, or save the file by clicking here. (13:44/12.5 MB)
At 13:44, this is the shortest audio episode in Christus Vincit history (up to now anyways).

Today's brief episode includes a Suggestion Box, a Don't Do This at Church scenario, and a reflection on the second of seven "O Antiphons".

Today's antiphon: O Adonai

Suggestion Box: Christmas - Vigil Mass.
More information: CanticaNOVA Planning Page for Christmas - Vigil Mass

Music: O Adonai (Chant, Mode II); Veni, Veni, Adonai (from Veni, Veni, Emmanuel, Chant, Mode I)

CVA Interactive Corner

Monday, December 17, 2007

CHRISTUS VINCIT ANYWHERE! 107




You can listen below, or save the file by clicking here. (35:32/32.5 MB)
Special thanks to the Garrepy boys for their musical help!

The first in a seven-part series. We will be reflecting on each of the "O" Antiphons as they fall on their respective dates. Though today's show is of regular length, most of the next few shows will be mini-episodes.

Today's antiphon: O Sapientia

Music:
On Jordan's Bank (tune: Winchester New); Magnificat (Psalm Tone 8G, simple form)
Rejoice! the Lord Is King (tune: Darwall's 148th); O Sapientia (Chant, Mode II)
Veni O Sapientia (from Veni, Veni, Emmanuel, Chant, Mode I)
O Come, O Come, Emmanuel (Chant, Mode I), by Fugli, courtesy of Podsafe.

Feasts for the Week: St. Thomas the Apostle; St. Peter Canisius.
For more information, check out the New Advent Website.

Suggestion Box: Fourth Sunday of Advent
Hymnody in Inflationary Language: Shamus O'Reilly recites the "O" Antiphons in Latin and English, brought to you by The Cat Chorale.
Additional Links: CanticaNOVA Planning Pages for IV Advent, St. Leo the Great Church (Pawtucket, RI)

CVA Interactive Corner

Saturday, December 15, 2007

MY NEW FAVORITE SECULAR CHRISTMAS CAROL

OK - one of my pet peeves around Christmas, as many of our readers know, is the trashy (or tacky at best) Christmas songs that get played on the radio these days. I've always said that if you're going to trash a Christmas song, at least be FUNNY about it, which explains why I mentioned earlier as my favorite secular Christmas song, Ding Fries Are Done!

Last night I discovered my new favorite Christmas song, right here. Hilarious!
Enjoy!
Peace,
BMP

Friday, December 14, 2007

WHERE WE WENT WRONG

Here's part of it right here. (PHT to Jeffrey Tucker at NLM)

After all this time, I just found out by reading this article what "FEL" stands for in Ray Repp's old publishing outlet --- "Friends of English Liturgy". Friends like that, who needs enemies?!

Keep a barf bag by your side while reading.
Peace,
BMP

Thursday, December 13, 2007

BCL VS. BCDW

In the December 2007/January 2008 edition of the Adoremus Bulletin, there is an article contrasting two different speeches to the Federation of Diocesan Liturgical Commissions (FDLC) - one by former BCL head Bp. Trautman, and one by Msgr. Anthony Moroney, who was honored for 20 years of service to the FDLC and the USCCB's Secretariat for Liturgy.

Trautman:
“There should be no backsliding”

We all know we're not backsliding. We're just trying to correct our wrongs. Once we do that, then a-forward we shall go. :)

Moroney:
“our dream” is “to bring heaven to earth: to experience a glimpse of the heavenly Jerusalem in the Sacred Liturgy”

In other words, restoring the "Holy" in "Holy Mass".

Although Msgr. Moroney has stepped down as BCL Secretariat, he continues to serve on the Vox Clara committee, as well as serve as consultant for the new BCDW.

Read the whole article at Adoremus.
Peace,
BMP

Wednesday, December 12, 2007

I THINK CDL. DINARDO WILL DO JUST FINE

In an interview with Zenit, the Cardinal from Houston had this to say:

With regard to the liturgy, I think we can take a cue from the liturgical piety of the Church Fathers. In the Fathers, you see an emphasis not only on the words said at Mass, but also the importance of the gestures of the liturgy. In other words, say the black, do the red.

All the makings of a cardinal who gets it!

PHT (Patriots Helmet Tip) to the great Father Z.
Peace,
BMP

FROSTY? JESUS?

Could be. Domini Sumus makes the following observations while watching Frosty the Snowman - and it's quite interesting (I've probably seen it on an average once a year since 1969 - I was five then, so that's at least 38 times, PLUS, since the advent of the VCR video and the DVD, tack on dozens of times a year for the past 10 years).
Frosty is born at Christmas.
Frosty gives his life to save Karen.
Santa allows the cold wind (Holy Spirit) to come into the greenhouse and
Frosty comes back to life.
Frosty goes to the North Pole with Santa.
Frosty promises to return

There it is - Nativity, Passion/Death, Resurrection, Ascension, and the Promise of a Second Coming!

WHOA!
Peace,
BMP

SING TO THE LORD, PARS SEXTA

OK - sorry for the delay. Before we continue, I feel the need to point out something Mike O'Connor mentioned in the combox for Part 4 today, and I feel this highly supports my gripe about the now-former BCL decrying cassock and surplice for choir/director/cantor/psalmist/etc.

Actually Pius X did state in Tra le sollicitudine that cassock and surplice should be worn by choirs when singing in the sanctuary BECAUSE they were exercising a clerical role. Since women were not allowed to participate in a choir in the sanctuary, they could not wear cassock and surplice since that would be the only time they could.

Thank you much for that, Mike!

Now, back to our regularly scheduled programming - - - Today we continue our Sing to the Lord series, that alleged "sequel" to Music in Catholic Worship. The section we'll be covering today is "Leadership and Formation". Here goes.

48. The whole assembly is actively involved in the music of the Liturgy. Some members of the community, however, are recognized for the special gifts they exhibit in leading the musical praise and thanksgiving of Christian assemblies. These are the liturgical musicians, as described in section E, above, and their ministry is especially cherished by the Church.

First of all, kudos for not using (or misusing) the term "pastoral musicians". They used the term "liturgical musicians", instead. I don't know about the average Catholic, but I tend to define "liturgical musician" as a musician who plays truly liturgical music, and not just plop together four of the "greatest hits" along with a Mass setting that has a plethora of alterations in the text.

49. Liturgical musicians are first of all disciples, and only then are they ministers. Joined to Christ through the Sacraments of Initiation, musicians belong to the assembly of the baptized faithful; they are worshipers above all else. Like other baptized members of the assembly, pastoral musicians need to hear the Gospel, experience conversion, profess faith in Christ, and so proclaim the praise of God. Thus, musicians who serve the Church at prayer are not merely employees or volunteers. They are ministers who share the faith, serve the community, and express the love of God and neighbor through music.

OH CRAP! Too good to be true, I guess. They said "pastoral musicians" after all. But like I said before, I know a couple of Anglicans who do just as well with the liturgy as (if not better than) most Catholics. One of them may have converted. I'm not exactly sure.

50. All pastoral musicians—professional or volunteer, full-time or part-time, director or choir member, cantor or instrumentalist—exercise a genuine liturgical ministry. The community of the faithful has a right to expect that this service will be provided competently. Pastoral musicians should receive appropriate formation that is based on their baptismal call to discipleship; that grounds them in a love for and knowledge of Scripture, Catholic teaching, Liturgy, and music; and that equips them with the musical, liturgical, and pastoral skills to serve the Church at prayer.

I'll agree to that. Can we "form" new musicians to undo the mess-ups of the last 40 years?

51. Preparation for music ministry should include appropriate human formation, spiritual formation, intellectual formation, and pastoral formation. Bishops and pastors should encourage liturgical musicians to take part in ministerial formation opportunities offered by universities, colleges, seminaries, ministry formation programs, dioceses, and national ministry associations. Parishes and dioceses should provide the financial support needed to ensure competent liturgical musical leadership.

The CMAA would be an excellent place to start (in terms of national ministry associations).

52. The service of pastoral musicians should be recognized as a valued and integral part of the overall pastoral ministry of the parish or diocese; provision should be made for just compensation. Professional directors of music ministries and part-time pastoral music ministers should each receive appropriate wages and benefits that affirm the dignity of their work.

Yes - thank you!

53. Liturgical music ministers should be provided with the proper resources to carry out
their administrative functions in a professional manner.


Absolutely!

So, we have one section anyways that (overall) I can rate as quite good. Next post will be "Music in Catholic Schools". Rave or rant? Stay tuned.

Peace,
BMP

MY NEW CHOIR

OK - I've been out of work for about nearly four weeks now, but here is the new choir I get to direct in order to stay in practice for the next job I get.


This cat is a former lounge singer at St. Joan's and is now the soprano section leader in our Cat Chorale.


This soprano may look and act like Paris Hilton, but she's brought the roof down at Lincoln Center, so she likes to think.


One of our altos, this cat is an accomplished blues singer down at Lupo's Heartbreak Hotel, while doubling as a section leader at my former roundhouse church.


Pinky here was once a liturgical dance choreographer for a certain west coast religious misedumacation congress, until she found the knack for singing and joined last year's congress choir.


Finally, the founding member of the Cat Chorale, and one of the first parish folk group members. She even tried to start a folk group while the 1962 Roman Missal was still in force as the Ordinary Form of worship.

Think they can sing Gregorian Chant?
Peace,
BMP